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Conservation

PROJECTS

FUNDING NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL CONSERVATION PROJECTS

Australia Zoo is proud to fund various national and international Conservation Projects. Our current projects are successfully helping to protect many species including crocodiles, tigers, wombats, elephants and cheetah.

CONSERVATION PROJECTSADOPT AN ANIMAL CROCODILE RESEARCH
Sponsor a conservation project

When you visit Australia Zoo or Sponsor a Conservation Project, you are helping us to develop exciting new territory in wildlife and wilderness conservation. A portion of the proceeds go directly to support Australia Zoo’s conservation projects.

Cassowaries

Cassowary ConservationAustralia Zoo has partnered with Rainforest Rescue to save the Southern Cassowary!

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Cheetahs

Cheetah ConservationDespite their status as the fastest land mammal on earth, the cheetah is running out of time. With only 9,000 to 12,000 cheetahs left in the wild, this magnificent species has become critically endangered due to loss of habitat and cheetah-human conflict. Conflict occurs when cheetahs are wrongly blamed for livestock losses and subsequently killed by angry farmers.

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Crocodiles

Crocodile Conservation

Steve Irwin began crocodile research in the 1980s. His capture and study techniques remain the world's best to this day.

Today, Australia Zoo, in partnership with Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (QPWS) and the University of Queensland (UQ), are making monumental strides in the field of crocodilian research and conservation.

Through programs such as Crocs in Space, International Crocodile Rescue, not to mention the Irwin family's long-time involvement in trapping and relocating rogue crocodiles for the QPWS, we are fighting at the frontline in the battle to save the Saltwater Crocodile, and all crocodilian species, from persecution and eventual extinction.

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Elephants

Elephant ConservationWith no more than 30,000 elephants left in the forests of Asia, the population of Asian Elephants is rapidly declining. In fact, it is thought that this current figure is less than one tenth of the population of the Asian elephant’s African cousin.

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Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve

Crocodile Conservation

The Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve (SIWR) is a wetland conservation property and a tribute to Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin.

The 135,000 ha property, in Queensland's Cape York Peninsula, is home to a set of important spring fed wetlands which provide a critical water source to threatened habitat, provide permanent flow of water to the Wenlock River, and is home to rare and vulnerable plants and wildlife, which are threatened by Cape Alumina Pty Ltd mining lease applications.

The Steve Irwin Wildlife Reserve (SIWR) was acquired as part of the National Reserve System Programme for the purpose of nature conservation with the assistance of the Australian Government.

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Tigers

Tiger Habitat

Come along to Australia Zoo to catch a glimpse at our six magnificent Sumatran Tigers in action- they will take your breath away! It has taken millions of years for tigers to evolve into the beautiful, awe-inspiring predator we have today. Once roaming over nearly one-fifth of the Earth, the tiger has been pushed into small isolated islands of habitat, often surrounded by a sea of humanity. It is presently a very real possibility that the tiger will become extinct in our lifetime.

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Tasmanian Devils

Tasmanian DevilsTasmanian Devils suffer from what is known as the Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), an infectious cancer that can now be found across 70% of Tasmania. This disease is a cancer killing Tasmanian devils in the wild at an alarming rate.

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Tracking

Bindi and Robert release Rafael the turtleAustralia Zoo has established a number of Animal Tracking Projects that will enable our wildlife to have the greatest chance of survival.

Read about the release of Rafael, a three flippered Loggerhead Turtle, marked the launch of Australia Zoo’s Turtle Research Project.

 

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